fixing-a-flat-bike-tire

Imagine yourself, biking through the meadows. The sun is shining, the grass is swaying, and the overall view is simply mesmerizing. You’re riding through the wind, without a care in the world. For the first time in months, you have found the time to relax yourself; to unwind and break free from the stresses of the world. At this moment, the rest of the universe doesn’t matter. It’s just the wind on your face and the pedals on your feet.

How To Fix A Flat Bike Tire

fixing-a-flat-bike-tire

Imagine yourself, biking through the meadows. The sun is shining, the grass is swaying, and the overall view is simply mesmerizing. You’re riding through the wind, without a care in the world. For the first time in months, you have found the time to relax yourself; to unwind and break free from the stresses of the world. At this moment, the rest of the universe doesn’t matter. It’s just the wind on your face and the pedals on your feet.

Plop. Plop. Plop. You went.

Alarmed, you gather yourself and try to figure out what happened. Your bike has popped a tire! Good thing you were driving slowly. Else, you would be flying off the hill right about now. Devastated, you crouched on your back and leaned closer to the flat tire. “Bummer” you thought. “It’s flat as a pancake!” You gasp at the thought of having to pay for it. How much is everything going to cost? Is it going to cost at least half of your paycheck? Maybe even more? Wait, isn’t your paycheck due at the end of the month? It’s still the 12th!

Hold your horses. This is just a sample situation; don’t get too deep into character. Your bike’s okay. It’s still got two running wheels and no one’s paying anything. But really, when you do get tangled up in this kind of situation, it is natural to feel so alarmed. (1) Your dear bike is in trouble and (2) fixing it is going to cost you money. You have all the right to feel a little bit jumpy as you did a moment ago.

When faced with a flat tire, I bet the first thing that will come to your mind is to try and fix it yourself. Unless you have a degree in automotive or at least served as an apprentice in a tire/car salon, don’t try anything funny. You might just make matters worse. For jobs like this, you need to have the right knowledge before you take action.

We all can’t be mechanics now, can we?

Good news, however, is that if you try hard enough (and practice hard enough), even you can handle simple repairs like this. Before you even get a flat tire, here are a couple of things you need to follow: 

Always Bring A Spare

Before one of your tires even go flat, you always have to be prepared – especially when you’re planning to venture into long-distance trails. Bringing a spare can be difficult but it is possible when you get a compartment case installed on the back of your bike. We understand that lighter bikes are easier to drive. However, if you’re not planning to enter a dirt bike competition and the sole purpose of your bike is to serve as a traveling vehicle, then a compartment case shouldn’t be a problem. Better prepared than sorry!    

Here are more tips on how to gear up: https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/blog/tools-and-spares-cycling-what-to-pack-and-when

Keep A Repair Kit With You At All Times

If you plan on bringing a spare with you, then it goes without saying that you bring a repair kit as well. Common tools (e.g. wrench, pliers, etc.) that are needed for tire replacement should be included in your kit. After all, you’ll never know when you’ll be troubled by a flat tire. If there are people around to help you, then all is good. But if there are none, all you can do is rely on yourself and make do with whatever you have. So pack up some emergency tools, will you? 

Get To A Nearby Gasoline Station & Refill Air

If the flat tire did not go “POP!” then there’s a good chance that the air had just somewhat escaped to the outside. First, check if your tire has been punctured. Spotting a puncture shouldn’t be too difficult as the escaping air inside will likely create a fizzing sound. If there seems to be no visible damage to the tire, you can try to refill the air (local gas stations should have air supply). Air can naturally diffuse from a tire over time. It could be that before you even got on your bike, some air has escaped already and continued to escape until the tire went flat. Always check if your bike tires have enough air before going out for a ride. 

Learn How To Replace A Flat Tire

If the tire has a puncture, then the only way to fix it is to replace it. And you can’t do that if you don’t know, right? Since you’ve taken up biking as a sport, it is only proper that you learn troubleshooting tasks such as replacing a tire. If you have a friend who can do it, have him teach you. If you know an expert, have him teach you. If you have no physical teachers, then you can always check out video and text resources online.

Visit A Local Vulcanizing Shop

Finally, if the damage is too overwhelming for you to handle, it would be wise to leave the handwork to the professionals. Visit the nearest vulcanizing or bike repair shop and have your bike checked. Never try to remedy problems that are outside your capabilities. You may end up doing more harm than good and turn what should be “inexpensive repairs” to crazy expensive! Bring your bike to a repair shop, go home, relax on a recliner or whatever, and take your mind off it. Just leave the work to the experts, please.

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