how-to-clean-wood-flooring

Wooden floors are classic. Think red mahogany and maple. Oak’s good too, being very stable and all. It’s funny how the world of architecture and interior design keep playing tricks on society. From wooden floors they introduced concrete ones, and now the trend is going back to wooden floors again – not that I’m complaining though. I love wood designs. I like nature-inspired interiors. I think it is fitting for man to live in a dwelling that resembles his natural home – the Earth.

How To Clean Wood Flooring

how-to-clean-wood-flooring

Wooden floors are classic. Think red mahogany and maple. Oak’s good too, being very stable and all. It’s funny how the world of architecture and interior design keep playing tricks on society. From wooden floors they introduced concrete ones, and now the trend is going back to wooden floors again – not that I’m complaining though. I love wood designs. I like nature-inspired interiors. I think it is fitting for man to live in a dwelling that resembles his natural home – the Earth.

However, like all other materials, wooden floors have their own sets of pros and cons. One of the most prominent advantages of having a wooden floor is aesthetic. It simply looks amazing and I know that this fact alone is enough to encourage several market factions to install wooden floors in their homes. It is also light and cool to the feel. If you’ve ever lived in a wooden house, you’ll know what I’m talking about.

There are many downsides to installing wooden floors too, however. Price, for instance, is a factor that turns off many potential buyers. Wood – well, real wood – can cost way more than cement, tiles, or even when both are combined. Cutting down a tree to create wooden panels will come at a cost, obviously. Durability-wise, cemented floors are tough (if not tougher) than wooden ones. So let’s just say that we have a tie in this criterion. Still, another problem about wooden floors can be considered alarming – maintenance.

The maintenance of wooden floors can be challenging and costly – especially when we’re dealing with their preservation. You see, wooden floors are easy to stain yet hard to clean. This makes maintaining them a real pain in the neck. If you are still decided to have them installed in your home, however, here are some tips we can leave you with:

Prevention is ALWAYS better than cure

Rather than cleaning dirt or stains off your wooden floors, a bigger concern you should put under careful consideration is how you’re supposed to preserve it. Wood can easily chip off and look worn out when you don’t properly apply the right conservation methods. Before worrying about spontaneous damages and accidental stains, you should first look into the long-term maintenance of your wooden floor.

The best way to preserve the beauty of your wooden flooring is to apply a clear coat – a surface finish of some sort. Well, the most popular surface finish many households use by far is Water-Based Polyurethane. You may also consider using oil sealers and aluminum oxide, as well as a bunch of other surface finishes mentioned on this article.

Applying a surface finish does not only help your wooden floors look and feel better; it also helps it last longer thanks to the finish’s added protection. When choosing which surface finish to apply, consider what type of “look” you want your wooden floors to have. Some types will leave your floors looking glossy while others will create a more matte-like effect. But more than just aesthetic, make sure that you factor in durability and reliability at all times. After all, the preservation of your wooden floor depends on it!

Simple Remedies Are Often Best

Now, let’s move on to accidental and spontaneous damages such as dirt and stains. Say you’ve applied a surface finish already and so far, it’s been working really well. Still, this doesn’t make your wooden floors immune to consequential damages. Spillage, for example, of food and drinks (especially those with a particularly strong color) may cause stains on your wooden floors. Tracking dirt inside your home may also leave unnecessary marks on the floor, especially when left alone for prolonged periods of time. Anyway, there are many ways your wooden floors can get stained or partially damaged but let’s not dwell on that. What we should concern ourselves most about is the solution.

Oftentimes, we fail to find the remedy to our problems because we look too hard. Some answers are right there before our very eyes but we fail to recognize them because we keep overthinking everything. Mind you, putting too much thought into a matter that is supposedly simple can be very dangerous. It may bring more harm than good! The same goes with your wooden floors. When you see the first signs of damage, don’t panic. Instead, try the most obvious solutions first.

With all that being said, please don’t go buying the most potent stain removal solution out in the market on the first sight of stains on your wooden floors. Why? Well, I’ve got two reasons for you:

First, it’s because you may potentially cause further harm on your floor instead of curing it.

Second, you may be spending unnecessary cash on a problem that is not even worth it.

Before you do anything rash, try removing the stain using the simplest of methods – a dish cloth dipped in warm water. If it doesn’t work, add a little soap and make the cloth sudsy. If it still doesn’t work, you can try using hydrogen peroxide to cure the stain. Thing is, you shouldn’t escalate the problem too quickly. Think calmly and work your way through the simplest of methods up to the most complex. Don’t jump stages. It’ll save you time, effort, and money.

Wax It; Shine It

The moment you find a suitable solution for the stain, you may want to consider waxing your wooden floors next. Not only does wax help maintain your floor’s vibrant shine; it can also help prevent future stains by providing an additional coat of protection to your wooden floors. Wax isn’t very permeable to liquid materials, you see. This means that accidental spillages will not make their way through the hard wood instantly thanks to the coating of wax. You’ll still have enough time to wipe spills off the floor before they get deep enough to stain the wood.

Create a regular schedule for wax application. Trust me, it’ll go a long way.

No To Harmful Chemicals

Finally, if you do find the need to use store-bought chemicals to clean wood flooring, choose brands that are organic. Plant-based solutions are often less potent and hazardous – not just for your floor but for the person doing the application as well. Choose something that is eco-friendly and does not emit harmful fumes and odors. Strong formulas may do your wood flooring more harm than good. Choose wisely.

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